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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just a quick heads-up for anyone who might not know.

Like most cars these days, the T Roc is choc full of sensors for various systems but one to perhaps especially watch out for is if you get a warning (!) message on your dash accompanied by a short message such as "Brake Servo Restricted"; a message might also follow saying that your START/STOP function is not working.

The problem can often be resolved by the replacement of the brake servo pressure sensor. You won't welcome the bill but if a new sensor does the trick, you're in luck. I don't know precisely how the servo works but it depends on a vacuum; a faulty sensor and your ABS module will compensate. Without servo assistance, your brakes will work but they won't work the way you're used to AND driving this way can apparently trash your ABS system.

The cost of a new sensor is less than £100; the cost of a new ABS system is £Thousands. It may never happen to you but it seems to be an issue for VAG Group cars and some, worryingly, just out of warranty.

If your warranty is about to expire get your servo sensor changed as a precaution. You don't want a bill for ABS that could be more than the cost of a small used car.
 

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As a note I think the face lift models don’t use a vacuum servo any more it may just be the 1.5 litre Seal will know for sure
 
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yes,all T-Rocs 1.5 L from June 2022,there is no vacuum pump,in 1.0 L it is necessary to check
 
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Just a quick heads-up for anyone who might not know.

Like most cars these days, the T Roc is choc full of sensors for various systems but one to perhaps especially watch out for is if you get a warning (!) message on your dash accompanied by a short message such as "Brake Servo Restricted"; a message might also follow saying that your START/STOP function is not working.

The problem can often be resolved by the replacement of the brake servo pressure sensor. You won't welcome the bill but if a new sensor does the trick, you're in luck. I don't know precisely how the servo works but it depends on a vacuum; a faulty sensor and your ABS module will compensate. Without servo assistance, your brakes will work but they won't work the way you're used to AND driving this way can apparently trash your ABS system.

The cost of a new sensor is less than £100; the cost of a new ABS system is £Thousands. It may never happen to you but it seems to be an issue for VAG Group cars and some, worryingly, just out of warranty.

If your warranty is about to expire get your servo sensor changed as a precaution. You don't want a bill for ABS that could be more than the cost of a small used car.
I think you're talking about 5Q0 906 207 /A sensor?
 

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If your warranty is about to expire get your servo sensor changed as a precaution.
I'm not sure I understand what you are proposing.

A dealer will not replace the sensor under warranty if it is not showing as faulty, but are you suggesting paying £100 for a new sensor (and labour ?), even though the sensor isn't faulty, just as a precaution against (possible) damage to the ABS system ?

If such expensive damage was likely/possible, surely the VW service routine would include checking this sensor or replacing it every X miles or Y years, in the same way they recommend replacing the cambelt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I'm not sure I understand what you are proposing.

A dealer will not replace the sensor under warranty if it is not showing as faulty, but are you suggesting paying £100 for a new sensor (and labour ?), even though the sensor isn't faulty, just as a precaution against (possible) damage to the ABS system ?

If such expensive damage was likely/possible, surely the VW service routine would include checking this sensor or replacing it every X miles or Y years, in the same way they recommend replacing the cambelt.
A cambelt won’t show as faulty but you would pick up the tab for its replacement to avoid a trashed engine. Changing a sensor is a much less invasive (or expensive) precaution and I would hope it would become routinely replaced in future.

In the meantime, I think the public-spirited thing to do is to let the people know the possible consequences of the warning and perhaps decide with their Dealer/VAG the best way to handle this issue.
 
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